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Breaking the Mold with KING NOIRE

Updated: Dec 31, 2022

INTERVIEW BY BRIDGETT MAGYAR


King Noire is a radical force to be reckoned with. He brought Petit Mort into his world and taught us a few things along the way; by detailing his journey into sex work and activism, parenthood, and the liberation that comes with decolonizing your sexuality. King Noire shed some light on how to put power and pleasure back into your own hands.


PETIT MORT (BRIDGETT MAGYAR)

You are an accomplished and award-winning writer, porn performer, artist, Master fetish trainer, emcee, and global activist. Using the proceeds of your album “Music is my weapon” to build a school freshwater well and medical clinic in Guinea Bissau, West Africa, you used your position in the adult industry to develop an ethically made molded toy in partnership with lust arts, raise consciousness around kink safety for people of color, provide lectures on the decolonization of sexuality, and offers sex education to audiences ranging from college students to medical providers. That’s quite a bit. My first question for you is, can you start by telling us a little bit more about yourself personally and your journey through the sex industry and how you got started.


KING NOIRE

Well, the first real experience was with a friend, she was a dancer. They asked her to be in a porn magazine. And she didn’t want to be in it with somebody she didn’t know. So she reached out to me, knowing that I was in a spot where I needed some money. We had messed around with each other since high school. I was 18, she’s a little bit older than me. So she was like, “Come get this money. I know you like sex and showing off.” and that was my first experience ever doing anything in the industry. From there, the photographer linked me up with a person who kind of produced porn, not movies that we would see anywhere, but he had a little spot in Jersey where they made movies for themselves. They filmed me with his wife and a few with other people he would hire for shoots. He then connected me with couples who were interested in booking me for cuckholding sessions which led to my initial BDSM work.


I’ve always been kinky since I started exploring sexually. I’ve always been into kinky things, but I didn’t know the names for all of it. I did all types of shit, but I didn’t know that there was a whole community and whole lexicon of kinky behaviors. So getting all these clients at the time, who were like, “Hey, I really want you to tie me up, spank me, paddle me, or electrocute me,” going down the list of all kinds of things most of it being brand new to me at that age I really got to learn from them with an on the job education. They would tell me, “This is what I like,” and in order not to injure or hurt me this is how to do it and make it pleasurable for me, “This is how I need you to do it.” And at the time, it was not only just the exploration of sexuality, but it was truly the definition of what a lot of sex work is for me; providing a safe space for clients to explore their kinks, fetishes and pleasures with a professional. I was soaking up as much information as possible, both in the fetish side of things and doing nude modeling—anything I could possibly do, I was a Swiss Army Knife. Multi-functional. From there, I actually started to seek out professional Doms/ Dommes who knew what they’re doing. Taking classes and learning from practitioners directly. I think it is also important to point out that there were some dungeon spaces when I started out that would not let me in and teachers who would not take me on as a student based on their racist views and stereotypes.


PM

So you sort of stumbled into the kink community? Or would you say your first kink experience was a sex work situation?


KN

When I was younger, I was already experimenting with handcuffs and candle wax and recording ourselves. I guess I already had the desire and the yearning, and the kinks and fetishes for it, but I just wasn’t exposed to the community. I got exposed to the community through sex work.


PM

It’s a pretty fascinating entry point. Oftentimes you find your community in sex work through your collegues and peers, but to learn through practice and experimenting (topping from the bottom) as opposed to shadowing a domme or having a mentor is a pretty subversive way to enter the kink community. When did you get into sex education and fetish training parts of your work?


KN

Fetish training, as a whole, really started about 10 years ago when Jet Setting Jasmine and I started working together. We started doing Fantasy Flight parties. At the parties, so many people had questions and didn’t know safe ways to engage. And also, for people of color—especially 10 years ago, we were not made to feel welcome in the kink community. I can’t say we’re fully made to feel welcome now, but it definitely was worse 10 years ago. You didn’t see a lot of people of color in films in regards to any kind of kinks or fetish stuff. There weren’t people out there teaching how to look for bruises on people with darker skin, or how to work around some of the traumas we have towards certain sex acts or different fetishes that might be triggering for us. We decided to not only use what we had already learned both individually and together, but we sought out more classes, we sought out more knowledge and information to be able to bring it directly to our people that were in need.


PM

Was it difficult for you and Jasmine to find people who were already teaching this sort of awareness and kink education to people of color or was it a gap in the kink community that you both sought to fulfill?


KN

I think that from when I first got into the community it’s kind of like one of those elbowed our way inside [situations]—If you’re going to close the door in my face I’m coming through the window. Because I think it’s important to say that if humanity started in Africa, if people are doing something, Black people probably did that shit first. When we were in Kenya, we got into discussions about colonization, and they have some of the same puritanical views of sex that we have here in America that African Americans have, because we were colonized by the same people.

But there they actually have a direct connection to their line and their heritage before colonization. So we got to have conversations where we were like, “Oh, yeah, this thing is made out of horsehair that looks like a flogger.” And they were like “Yo, so like, some people’s parents use it to beat them. Other people’s parents use it to beat on their parents.” Like this flogger has been in existence for thousands of years. But at the same time, you might go to a kink event or a BDSM event in New York City and people are looking at you funny because you’re Black.


When I first started doing it people looked at me crazy. To be a kink professional or exhibitionist or fetish person who partakes in any kind of fetish play, there’s not a dress code, but people will act like because I’m in there in jeans and Timbs, I don’t belong there. But denim is a fetish. People have a fetish for wearing work boots. I mean, look at how many photoshoots where people got dudes naked in Timbs. You’re just not recognizing some of the fetishes that we like. Or you’re not recognizing the fetishes that you have that we can have also. At a certain point, we’re just like, “Okay, we’re just gonna go to these classes, we’ll be in these classes.” And when I used to be booked by clients at dungeons in New York, or sex parties in New York, they were looking at me like I don’t belong and acting funny. Then sometimes my client or whoever hires me to be there to perform, after I perform, those same people are asking who I am. Like, “Oh, that was sexy!” But before you were denying me a drink, so I think it’s kind of one of those things with all spaces— not to conflate it, but all the places in America.

Whatever the spaces are, white people have not wanted us there. We’ve made our own and because we made our own people are like, “Oh, wow, what y’all are doing is poppin’, can y’all come do that at our space now?”


PM

I mean historically, the kink community is pretty racist and lacks any real representation visually of any Black people, brown people, anyone who’s typically not a cishet white person in those spaces. When you and Jasmine started doing this separately and together was this sort of the entry point into your activism?


KN

Actually, I’ve been an activist for my entire life. My mother, she did sit-ins and she marched with Dr. King, she was in the Peace Corps. My mother always was saying, “If you’re not doing something for your people, then you’re not doing anything.” No matter what it is. In order to make a better world, you have to work on yourself, work with your family, work with your community, and so on and so forth. That’s just how she raised me. So my first experiences with activism, I was like 10 years old, one of my friend’s cousins was murdered by the police. That was how I began speaking out and learning the world as is, and trying to change it for the better. Through music, I’ve actually worked all over the world. Here in the United States, I also worked in England, Guinea Bissau, Palestine, and Ireland. Working with youth and adults in writing workshops on how to use music and lyrics as conflict resolution, whether it be conflict with other people or conflicts with yourself.


IF YOU’RE GOING TO CLOSE THE DOOR IN MY FACE I’M COMING THROUGH THE WINDOW.


PM

Could you talk about your work in Guinea Bissau and what drew you to creating community relationships and providing care there?

KN

There’s a group of emcees in Guinea Bissau called the Baloberos Crew. And Baloberos had written a song about how Guinea Bissau was a narco-state, naming people in their government that are involved in the drug trade. So they had gotten arrested and detained by the government for a long amount of time. This organization reached out and wanted me to translate their lyrics from slang Portuguese, which was like a mix of several languages. They wanted me to translate it to English and perform it via satellite with them, and it was done at Nuyoricans Poets Cafe in New York. It went really well. Then the same organization paired with some other organizations in Africa to bring me and my manager to Senegal and then to Guinea Bissau to do a performance. I was the first American hip hop artist to ever perform in Guinea Bissau.

We worked with kids on writing projects, spoke with adults about music and the history of hip hop and how they’re using hip hop in Guinea Bissau to make a change. It was an incredible experience. After we returned a woman named Ms. Devon Austin reached out to us. She had done one of those ancestry tests, and found out that her ancestry was primarily from Guinea Bissau. She then Googled it and because I was the first American artist to perform there, my name popped up. She reached out, like, “Hey, I’ve been doing this program” where she got donations of dresses to send to young ladies there so they would be able to go to school. And she was like, “I want to do something bigger. We want to try and build a school in a village named Djati because whenever the rainy season happens, their school gets washed away.” She originally suggested a show, but we decided on an album so that the money could build up more and keep going. We were able to build a school, a freshwater well, and a medical clinic with solar panels for Doctors Without Borders.


PM

Wow. How do you manage to balance all these different creative projects between your music, your fetish training, creating community relationships, and having such an expansive family?


KN

I have no idea. How does your body just do what it do? Breathe, do all the things? I feel like all of it is just a part of who I am. And finding that balance is one of those daily duties – ebbs and flows. I mean, I’ve wanted to be a father longer than I’ve wanted to be anything else. I enjoy being a dad and I love music. Even if I didn’t put music out for people to hear it, I’d still be making it somewhere in my own spare time. And then everything else, that’s our business, it’s what feeds our family. So, gotta keep going on that.


PM

Right. So you and your partner, Jet Setting Jasmine, you work a lot together and you’ve been together for over 10 years. How has that been to work with your partner, your wife, in sex work and in the educational and activist space?


KN

Oh, I love it. I learn from Jasmine daily. I think she’s brilliant. Not everybody is lucky enough to work with somebody they like. I’ve had so many jobs with people that I could not stand. So not only do I work with somebody I like, I work with somebody I love, it’s amazing. There’s also a tremendous amount of respect. Not only for each other as humans but for our work. That love, that respect, and that drive, it’s inspiring. We both work on different legs of the business at times so we are not always all up in each other’s space. Sometimes just updates, and then other times we’re co-directing films, working on a project or teaching a class together. It’s good because we have times when we’re both in our own space, doing our own thing, and then I finish editing something for her to put fresh eyes on, Or she’s like, “I have worked with a team on putting together the mailouts for the people we represent for content management.” and I follow up with the talent. Another day we are writing out a shot list and location scouting together. It changes enough that I feel like we don’t have to be at odds with each other and appreciate the others irreplaceable value to our success.


PM

I think what comes across pretty clearly in your partnership is respect. It’s very obvious in the way that you both represent your relationship and the work that you do. You both make space for one another as well. It’s really beautiful to witness. That being said, I’m also curious how both you and Jasmine navigate–and you personally being a parent–being a parent in sex work? What has your approach been in informing them on what you and Jasmine do?


KN

Well, I think it’s very important that any of those kinds of conversations are age-appropriate. I think about how our oldest has grown up as our business has grown. Jasmine had to have those early conversations with her like “Mommy has a bag of toys. Don’t go through Mommy’s bag of toys just like you don’t want Mommy going through your toys,” but that kind of conversation isn’t just about our job. There are all types of people with adult toys you don’t want your kids going through, so instead of them stumbling on it when they go through your shit, warn them and set boundaries.

If you are sneaky your kids will be sneaky. There is nothing wrong with letting them know what is off limits to them. In high school she went through some bullying in because of of our job, but she knew through us, the truth, and how to be prepared for people who had things to say, she was able to combat that easy by saying that’s an adult site and you are not old enough to be on it which shut the kid down. We block all the kids on social media and have them block us as well.


PM

I’m sure that level of transparency has been what has saved your relationship.


KN

And everybody is different. You know, all our kids are individuals. Our second oldest, she’s awesome. She’s like, “My father does music, my mother is a therapist,” which is true, right? She doesn’t try to get into all that other stuff. She’s not really interested, whereas our oldest is more like, “They do this, they did that,” and she’s hype about it. And then with the little ones, with our son, he’s four. I don’t need to tell him in any detail about what we do, he just knows mommy goes to work, daddy goes to work, and that’s it. Even with the others when they were younger, you don’t have to get into details with kids of certain ages. Kids don’t really care what you do for work, they just know you’re gone for a certain amount of time. And when you come home, you love them and give them all the attention that they want. And you can buy them the things that they want because you have a job. They’re not really interested in the details.


PM

Right. I feel like there’s sort of this inherent pressure or separate code of morals that people project onto sex workers for telling their kids like, how are you going to inform your kids [about your work]? How are you going to let them know what it is that you do? Which is obviously, also inherently shaming the work, but I think like what you said, you tell your children according to age. I had no idea what my parents’ jobs entailed when I was little. Sex work is no different.


KN

I think you hit the nail right on the head with that— there is this whole other thing that you’re supposed to explain when you’re a sex worker. The first thing they ask is, would you want your kids doing your job? No, I want them to do whatever makes them happy. Whether it’s this whole thing, if you’re a stripper or you’re a cam model, or whatever. People don’t go up to someone in the military and be like, “Do you want your kids doing your job?” Or whatever the job is. There are a whole lot of jobs I’m sure people are like, “I want my kids to do something else.” And other jobs people want their kids to follow in their footsteps. No matter what they do I just want them to do it to the utmost and enjoy their work.


PM

Exactly.


KN

Shifting back to a conversation that I had with some of our friends in Kenya, if you come from a colonized people, especially regarding our people here in America–our sexuality has been dictated to us for 500 years. We were told who to have sex with and how to have sex for hundreds of years in this country, and we’re still kind of told that through media. This country itself...a lot of times people only talk about cotton, but there were other plantations that made this country rich. Tobacco, sugar cane, rice, but the thing that truly made this country rich beyond anything else was Black people. Our ancestors. Free skilled labor. There were plantations where people weren’t farming– they were breeding plantations. Some of the founding fathers that hailed from Virginia had a couple of them.

In 1860, American slaves were worth $4 billion dollars, whereas America itself only had $228 million dollars worth of gold and silver circulating. $4 billion were our ancestors. America’s first bond market was supported by enslaved human beings. Slave owners mortgaged slaves, and then turned the mortgages into bonds that could be marketed all over the world. At that time, when they were having these slave plantations–breeding plantations, they forced enslaved girls to have kids as young as 13, and they’d have four or five kids by the age of 20 to replenish the slave population. Some were promised freedom if they did this, others were beaten, maimed, crippled, killed, or raped. For boys starting at the age of 15, they were inspected to see if they could breed well. Over the course of the next five years, they were expected to get upwards of 12 women pregnant.

Now, we think of what the stereotypes are of Black people in this country... almost every single stereotype that white people have of Black people in this country were either forced behaviors of slavery or something white people had to tell themselves to justify their brutality towards us. The idea that we’re promiscuous, the idea that we just have babies and don’t take care of our kids, and so on and so forth. These things were forced on us and these perceptions exist still today, right?

Then you also have other things that come with that, things like buck breaking, where bands of white men would travel from plantation to plantation and rape Black men who were deemed rebellious or an uncontrollable slave. Black people have been sexually terrorized here in America. We do teach a class on “The Fancy Trade,” as it was called, on how slave auctioneers sold people based on how much “Black blood” they had and the women who were were sold and sex trafficked. America as a country had sex trafficking as a policy. As part of its history, America sex trafficked Black people. Part of that still exists today in how we view that the lighter you are the prettier you are. People will say, “Oh, I hope my kid has straight hair. Oh, I hope my kid has green eyes. Oh, I hope my kid is fair-skinned.” Because we’re told we’re ugly the darker we are or with the more African features we have. And what’s considered sexy or “exotic” to white people is lighter skinned women.

So what is decolonizing sex? It is answering for ourselves what our sexuality is and gaining more insight into what it was before our culture was wiped from our consciousness. If you look at African history, just like the native people of this land, there were gay and trans people. There was polyamory, polyandry, polygamy. Everything across the board. Not to say it was perfect, but we exhibited a full spectrum of sexuality in our humanity. That’s what we need to reclaim. To find beauty in ourselves and to love ourselves. We have been working to do that with Royal Fetish Films since we started. If you look in our films, you’ll see African fabrics, you’ll see waist beads, you’ll see head wraps and natural hair, you’ll see us playing and listening to our own music, and referring to ourselves with language that’s not how mainstream porn refers to Black people.


PM

It’s a lot of unlearning. It’s centuries of unlearning what we are fed societally. It’s really incredible that you and Jasmine are such a radical presence in that space. If you could share something with someone who’s maybe just learning how colonized their sexuality really is and how that’s influenced their understanding of themselves or their practices, how would you suggest they start learning how to decolonize their sexuality?


KN

Start in the mirror and look at yourself for who you are and the beauty that you possess both inside and out. Think about the things that you’re attacked for. See your lips, your nose, your hips. Whatever it is you’re attacked for, then hold that up against society. I remember being in middle school, we were bused to the white side of town, and some people were not happy with it. I remember this one white kid was talking about this girl’s lips. I think about that and then I think now how people are getting collagen injected into their lips to look like our lips. To talk about our skin, and now people are burning themselves in tanning beds to have skin closer to ours. All the things that we’re told that we are ugly for. How many years was it that if you went to work with braids in your hair, you were considered unprofessional? But on vacation, white people come back with the same braids they tell us we’re ugly and unprofessional for. Even when it’s not racial, when somebody is trying to hurt your feelings, usually the shit they started talking bad about you for is the shit they wish they had. People usually try to lash out at the things they are jealous about. I think that racism and white supremacy is detrimental to white people too. If you’re out here like, “I hate these people” but you don’t have any grounds for why you hate them you have to build up this animosity and hatred for a group of people that you know nothing about. That shit must weigh on people’s souls. So it’s kind of the same thing, look in the mirror and love yourself too. You don’t have to hate somebody else to love yourself.


I THINK IN THE WORLD THAT WE'RE WORKING FOR, PEOPLE WOULD BE ABLE TO HAVE THEIR SEX LIVES AS FREE AS THE REST OF THEIR LIVES.

PM

Do you feel like you yourself have decolonized your sexuality, or you’ve achieved that?


KN

I am working my best to do so. I cannot say that I have completely done it, because I don’t even know what that completion looks or feels like yet. There will be something else that maybe I learn tomorrow that I didn’t even realize I held on to for so long or a new discovery I never even dreamt of before. Especially professionally, there’s so much that still weighs on that same thing. Going back to the plantation, Black men were chosen based on our anatomy because they thought that your anatomy would help you impregnate more people. Then you watch porn and you see companies like Blacked, that is literally using a racist term to sell interracial porn. The term “blacked” is racist as fuck. And people love that shit. And they give them awards every year for some racist ass shit. And then for people who do say something about it, they’re like, “Oh, don’t don’t mess with the fantasy.”

The fantasy that a white woman is no longer pure if she is with a Black man. Plantation fantasy. Plantations are the farthest thing from my fantasies. It’s something that we have to work just as hard to change because like you said, it’s undoing centuries and centuries of bullshit. At the same time, groups of people are rallying around their fear of “critical race theory”. Which really is a dog whistle for education what isn’t euro- centered and teaches some truth about atrocities and has POC perspectives in the curriculum. Here in Florida, they are pushing the “Woke Act” where it states that white people can’t be uncomfortable in conversations regarding race or some shit. I have no idea how they enforce this law but it’s some bullshit. That and the “Don’t Say Gay Bill” are insane.


PM

Wow. So I know you and Jasmine both have created toys with Lust Arts and you have a penis mold with them. The toys are ethically produced toys, and the term sustainable erotic comes up... What does that mean to you?


KN

Sustainable is about the process of how the toys are made. Lust Arts makes each toy by hand with eco- friendly materials. So it’s sustainable for the planet and sustainable pleasure for your enjoyment. But now I’m just thinking about sustainable erotic as something that is both healthy for your mind, body, and soul. That’s what it seems like. Seems like that would work.


PM

It feels tangential to decolonizing your sexuality too, and uplifting. It feels like it could be the symbiosis in your sex life, mind, body, soul.


KN

I think in the world that we’re working for, people would be able to have their sex lives be as free as the rest of their lives. Whereas you get to make decisions on your own body. You get to love who you want to love, be who you want to be, as long as it’s not infringing on anybody else’s freedoms of their sex life as well. I think that that will be a beautiful, sustainable sex world.


PM

Everybody having the liberty to explore their sexuality freely and minding their business at the same time.


KN

I think that would be the ideal world. Who you love shouldn’t hurt how I live my life. I think that that’s the thing that confuses me the most with all these people who want to hinder the rights of queer folk. What does this even have to do with your life? If you believe what you believe in your faith and your religion, then do that in your space. In public space, just as you’re allowed to hold your partner’s hand, I should be able to hold mine.


PM

Amen. Lastly, I wanted to ask you, going forward with your practice and your work, how do you anticipate your work evolving in the future? And what is a career goal that you have for yourself?


KN

I want to win an Oscar. When I was younger, I wanted to be a director of photography, a cinematographer. It’s one of the things I’ve always wanted to do. I used to do black and white photography and editing and all of that in school, so I’ve been able to apply that to our business. I love performing, I’m an exhibitionist at heart. But I’ve also been able to be behind the camera more–really try out some different things, like different looks and shots, things that I haven’t particularly seen in porn before. So, I would love to be able to shoot and be involved in a full-length feature film that does have lovemaking in it. I would love to create a beautiful film with a fascinating story, interesting characters that also has a true sex scene in it. That’s like a career project.


And then performance-wise, I got new music on the way, so just being able to expand musically and work with other talented musicians. Keep creating and keep being creative both in the art and also in how I father.


PM

Amazing. I hope that you get the Oscar! I hope you get a chance to make that film, I think that’s long overdue. Some quality sex scenes, quality scenes with queer, Black people and people of color on the screen making love in a real intimate way. Long overdue.


KN

Thank you.


PM

Thank you!








KING NOIRE INTERVIEWED BY BRIDGETT MAGYAR

PHOTOS BY TARRICE LOVE AND GENE TOLAN

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